Literary Dark Device

Article by S. Dorman Tevildo Prince of Cats was the first imaginative incarnation of Sauron the Dark Lord, whose power was destroyed in the unmaking of his Ring in the Third Age of Middle-earth. As many know, the process of writing is drafting and redrafting, a sort of making and remaking. An early incarnation of…

“Kubla Khan” and Father Nicholas Christmas?

 Article by David Llewellyn Dodds In 1927, John Livingston Lowes published The Road to Xanadu: A Study in the Ways of the Imagination with a revised edition following in 1930. He traces the “caves of ice” in Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan” (lines 36, 47) to William Bartram’s Travels through North and South Carolina, Georgia, East and…

How fast could C.S. Lewis read?

by Kevin McCall It is well known that C.S. Lewis was an extremely fast reader.  Richard Ladborough, in his essay “In Cambridge” in the bookC.S. Lewis at the Breakfast Table writes: “It is now common knowledge that his [Lewis’s] memory was prodigious and that he seemed to have read everything.”  In his essay “Jack on Holiday” in the same…

‘The Valley Is Jolly!’

This intriguing article is by S. Dorman The supporting characters mentioned in this piece are wrong. But are they wrong for their stories? I’ve talked before about wrong characters and how they can be wrong about particular things, or wrong overall in a peculiar way. This piece is a variation, or perhaps further explication, of…

High Diction

Article by S.Dorman   Author and journalist John Garth taught a course at Signum University on Tolkien’s War-time experience and its influence on language and creativity. J.R.R. Tolkien seems always to have been a lover of high diction, in communion with his love of philology and making languages, but Mr. Garth points out that Tolkien’s…

Article by S. Dorman   Is there a right—or wrong—way to fictionalize C.S. Lewis? I cannot say the question was considered when I began tearing into the materials for Fantastic Travelogue, a speculative fiction in which C.S. Lewis and Mark Twain talk things over in the hereafter. Fictionalizing questions that I came to later—in order…

The synergy of CS Lewis and Owen Barfield

Article by Professor Bruce G Charlton It is well known that CS Lewis and Owen Barfield were best friends, from soon after 1919 when they met as undergraduates in Oxford University until Barfield’s death in 1997, some 34 years after Lewis had died. Because Barfield’s active engagement with Lewis – as man and thinker – continued right throughout his life, as evidenced in…

Depictions of the Inklings, by the Inklings

Article by Professor Bruce G Charlton An Inklings meeting was the (usually) Thursday late-evening meeting in CS (‘Jack’) Lewis’s rooms at Magdalen College, Oxford; to read work in progress, criticize it, and have conversations arising from this. It is important to recognise that the focus of the Inklings was the writing of its members; even…

The Ship has Sailed

Article by J. Conrad Matthews Last week, I was looking at some artwork for a Dungeons & Dragons campaign I am playing in. The game had a new Dungeon Master, (not me!) and I was looking for a ‘look’ for my player. The sessions are lots of fun, the players are determining many of the…