Signal Boost: Writing Speculative Fiction

Writing Speculative Fiction:
Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror


Teacher’s Edition and Student’s Edition
By Lelia Rose Foreman

A new resource for writers and homeschoolers a like.

This textbook develops an 18-week program designed to guide prospective students through creating their own speculative fiction story, that is, a science fiction, fantasy, or horror story. Designed for homeschoolers and small-school settings, this textbook draws on excerpts from dozens of speculative fiction authors and writing experts. It gives detailed information about genre, cultural world building, physical world building, plot, character, character arc, heroes, villains, sidekicks, bystanders, description, conflict and tension, editing and revising, “your first chapter,” voice, words and worldview, science fiction, fantasy, and horror. Each chapter in the course contains exercises for students, including extra credit activities, in addition to guiding the creating of an individual short story.

The teacher’s edition includes a section on scope and sequence and contains answer keys.

This looks like a nice resource for homeschoolers and beginning writers. The work of many eminent speculative fiction writers appear within this work.

Teacher’s Edition

Student Edition

Astounding Frontiers Issue 2 is Out!

Dull and Preachy stories beware…

Astounding Frontiers Issue 2 is now out on amazon, featuring stories by Dragon Award Winner Brian Niemeier, Karl Gallacher, Scott Washam and Russel May. The serials by John C. Wright, Ben Wheeler, Nick Cole and Jason Anspach continue, and the cover features the beginning of a new serial by SuperversiveSF contributor Corey McCleery, whose awesome dad has been helping me with music videos. (there are more to come of those) Click on the image below to grab yourself a copy for the low, low price of $2.99!For those of you who’d like a more epic version of the above video, using some music by the ever-excellent Kevin Macleod, your wish is granted:

The Superversive in Film: The Last Starfighter

We return once more to that period between the late ’70s and mid ’80s when that last flourish of old-school pulp sensibility arose in the form of feature films out of Hollywood done by then-rising names in the business. This time, it’s The Last Starfighter, another Space Opera made possible due to the success of Star Wars.

This film, like Tron, falls into that “Boy’s Own Adventure” style of adventure where our hero–although an adult–still speaks and acts like the boys this film is intended to entertain. That means the film’s style of presentation is in harmony with that audience also: earnest, sincere, and uncomplicated- but not simple.

The reason this is superversive is that this film’s story, as with many stories aimed at boys, is about the necessity of accepting responsibility- not just for yourself, but on behalf of those depending upon you. For an emerging generation of boys, soon to become men, this learning how to face difficult and dangerous realities even when you would rather run because if you don’t no one else will.

A careful review of the story’s narrative shows this to be the case. The critical events that make our hero into the titular character comes about due to succumbing to that very fear and running from the responsibility that his previous actions–qualifying as a Starfighter gunner–put upon him. Today some would cry about this being unfair,
or unjust. That doesn’t matter; it’s a job that men need to do, like it or not, because not doing it means far, far worse for everyone- man, woman, and child. Stories like this are necessary for boys, because this reality is their future as men in one form or another.

Which brings up another, understated but no less critical point: at no point does our hero get dumped on for taking up his burden and doing his duty. The others that benefit by his actions appreciate what he risked for their sake, and it is this acknowledgement that completes the superversive elements of this story. No one wants to risk life and limb for ingrates, and no society so ungrateful benefits from such deeds for long as it subverts that fundamental institution of any healthy society and culture. The audience of the day rewarded this handsomely, making it one of the latter day classics with lasting influence. It still holds up today. Recommended.

St. Lucian’s Star: A Catholic Science Fiction Short Is Published

Out today at Lyonesse, a short fiction subscription service, is my science fiction adventure tale, St. Lucian’s Star. It’s the story from the POV of Lillyanne Troppe, a young lady with a gift for locating lost objects. Set in 2087, she gets the chance of a lifetime to accompany the handsome Relic Hunter, Darrion Artenan, on the recovery mission. The exciting adventure turns into a nightmare as things go wrong.

St. Lucian’s Star
By Dawn Witzke

Earth, 2087

“I’m closed!” I didn’t look when the bell jingled on the front door. It was likely just Alma. Again. The 103-year-old woman could never keep track of her keys. Or her purse. Or her teeth. Locating another lost set of keys was not on my agenda for the evening, but saying no to Alma wasn’t an option. What she lacked in size and strength, she made up for in attitude. The majority of my referrals were from Alma. If I denied her once, most of my clients would go with her. Finding lost keys wasn’t very exciting, but it paid the bills. At least it would be quick and then I could go upstairs, get in my pj’s, eat cold pizza, curl up with Jake and read the latest Declan Finn novel.

I inherited the building that served as both my home and office a few years past when the gentlemen I was renting from died. He had left me everything, which wasn’t much beyond the building and a cabin at Spirit Lake. I sold the cabin and used the money to fix up the building and upgrade the outdated appliances. I didn’t have much, but I didn’t need much.

On the first floor, the front door opened into a hallway that led to two rooms. The larger of the two was my work room, where I entertained clients. The other was my closet sized office where I kept the records for my floundering locating service.

Troppe Recovery.
Nothing is too small to locate.

Read the rest of the story at Lyonesse, then stop back and let me know what you think.

If you like it, consider signing up for my mailing list on my website. I have a new Lillyanne & Jake story coming out, exclusively for my subscribers.

And don’t forget to sign up for the Superversive SF Newsletter. You don’t want to miss anything. Trust me on this.

 

Eta Cancri review

Please welcome Xewleer to Superversive SF, he is a new reviewer and you can expect a lot more from him. His review is cross posted from his blog millennialking.wordpress.com

Spoilers! It’s a great book, and worth reading.

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I just finished Eta Cancri by Russell May. It was, surprisingly for an author who was not on my radar before, an excellent read chock full of delicious theology. It was a treat, to be sure. The characters are living and breathing with distinct personalities. The descriptions are on point. The science is a good medium-hard, with just the right amount of give for philosophical and theological conversations the teeth they need to grow. Ah… that more stories which pride themselves on science and philosophy would take this route!

The book switches through various characters’ POV. My personal favorites were Ed and June, along with the AI Archie. Each one has a solid voice and drive that breathes life into this book more than could be expected. Indeed, books that switch perspective live and die on this sword. I could tell that the POV shifted through the author’s choices in word play, character focus and other hints almost instantly.

The conceit of the story, which involves demonic possession, bacteria and genetic modification, was well done and quite unique to this author from my experiences. Though I have experimented and read up on demonic possession and stories about it, this is the first time I’ve seen it used in such a broad and interesting way. Nothing triggered any sort of violation of the suspension of disbelief. It holds up the story incredibly well. This is dreadfully important in this genre as Russell did it. If the suspension of Disbelief is violated, then the entire book will fall over itself and the threads that he depends on to carry the story forward logically will be lost, unable to be gained back.

Though there is no part of the story I groaned at the reading of, I did feel fatigue about halfway through on chapter 3 or 4 (?). The story before and after focuses on multiple characters, the evil of the Demon Legion, the science, philosophy and theology mix and POV shifts. This middle bit has nothing that really sticks out too hard. The story sticks to Pierce the techno-everyman and doesn’t shift too much. There’s just too much dialogue and not enough cool stuff to give us a rest between theological questions. Not that I was exhausted by the questions, I just wish the heady brew was cut a little with soda. Even a bit where Ed deals with his crazy and preps for the ship coming in, or June sees something which heightens our horror at the actions of Legion would do much for the pacing and general interest. I’ll point out that Ed has no reason to not succumb or struggle with Legion’s influence and a decent POV could have been written comparing and contrasting his belief in Dame Fortune and the belief in God, which is touched upon later but not to my satisfaction.

I’ll point out that, theologically, what we call Dame Fortune is the Will of God. That the saved man has free will is not something I debate or question. I question how much Dame Fortune impugns it. (I use Dame Fortune as a conceit from the story. Mentally, I use the term ‘Fate’) Does a belief in Fortune change how free will operates as we continue in Christian Free Will or Willfulness Against God? I think that there might have been an excellent few points to be made there between Ed and Father Justinian, more than was done in story. Though, there is a sequel in the cliff hanger, and I will be purchasing it as soon as it comes out.

I also wanted a little more debate on the nature on Transhumanism. I am not fond of it, as I believe that the body has the critical mass to keep the soul ‘Human’ and that, at a certain point, the ‘I as I’ that is ‘You as you are’ becomes warped into something that could be described as ‘ME’ 2.0. Also, what is morality to someone who is neither permanent or baseline human? (Though those points are touched on) June seemingly has no contrast in character, but rather is June personality as June soul is June without much debate despite much lycanthropy. Various ideas are presented with authority, but I don’t feel it is earned. The matrons producing ubermenschen in the asteroid belts are not properly repudiated in a manner that I call an argument. Rather, it is just presented as wrong. I dig, but I’m really hoping for a similar thing to Ed in the sequel.

I’ve not gone into the plot because it’s quite simple. A colony goes dark and a ragtag group of cyborgs, everymen and mercenaries go to figure it out and cleanse with fire whatever’s in there. Just about right, really. You don’t need fancy pants intrigue for stuff like this. Most of the characters are moral, upright and probably one of the best portrayals of Christians I’ve seen in Science Fiction. I’m sorry John C. Wright, but sort of randomly turning Mickey the Witch into the Space Pope of the Seventh Humans because of his wife without a redemption scene just doesn’t compare to baptism after flamebroiling demonic abominations with improvised explosives created by a literal Biblical evil. But it’s different scopes. That scene doesn’t compare to the Cathedral of Luna in the 4th book of Count to Eschaton. Ahhhh it’s perhaps differences in scale. But I’d be very interested in talking with Russel May some time to break down what he believes and what his reasoning is.

I wanted MORE, if you could believe it. I find that I have a hard time reading philosophy directly, so I have a better time consuming it if its regurgitated through literature, especially when the author provides examples within the story to provide a more definite framework for the reader to investigate. It really does wonders for the most artistically inclined philosophers, who may not be able to as readily read the great works directly. Of course, this assumes the reader is able to properly manage things that are presented vs. their origin points. Counter and counter-counter is appreciated through the characters of Archie, Father Justinian and even Legion. Legion’s absolute Nihilism is well presented without the usual tropes in plain evidence. There’s always a fresh horror from him. His unfetteredness and nihilism make an excellent baseline for the ‘evil’ of the universe. Nihilism is a hell of a drug, kids, and leads to madness.

I also think the book is missing a carnival scene. But then again, I’m a sucker for them. I also wanted more crazy bomb stuff fight scene flip outs from Michaud and Lars, but ah.

The combat scenes are fresh, well done. The weapons properly treated with excellent extensions of characterization through them. The creativity that Russell displays drives the story forward with brazen steps. Lar’s and the rest of the characters’ spirituality treated so delicately as to be art. Ah! There are few flaws and many boons to reading this book!

Overall this book is mos defs a purchase soft-cover, maybe hard-cover kinda book. Sadly, there are only kindle copies available at this time. It is worth a read! It is SUPERVERSIVE. I hope with fervent prayer that we are coming to an era where the dominant voice in Sci-Fi is Christianity! If Russell May joins the luminaries of the Superversives, Castalia House and others, shall not the glory of God be expanded in this genre of atheists, science worshippers and deviants?  DEUS VULT!

Xewleer

I, even I, drink ink like wine.

Do You Dare To Think Forbidden Thoughts?

In a world gone mad with special snowflakes, SJWs, Thought Police, and message fiction, there is one band of authors that stand against it all; refusing to bow before the tidal wave of the narrative.

There are many, readers and authors alike, that are tired of being told what they can and can’t write and read. That they must check all the boxes and post all the trigger warnings. That they must only agree with the Right Think. And that they never EVER even think about having different opinions, lest the mob come down on them with shouts of racist! sexist! Homophobe!

We’re sick of that. We don’t want message fiction, we want GOOD fiction. We want to be entertained, not bashed over the head with propaganda. We want diversity in fiction. But not racism disguised as diversity (like only reading, or not reading, authors because of their sex or skin color.) We want diversity in thought. Especially in science fiction.

That is what our genre is all about! Speculating about society and the future, wondering “what if?” and not shying away from difficult questions. No, we want to explore those questions, challenge those question, and answer them in our own way.  We want stories that are enjoyable and well crafted. We want stories that challenge our ideas and ideologies, and want to be able to write things that challenge even the most accepted trends in our times.  We want stories…. That. Make. Us. Think.

To censor is to murder free thought. And to murder free thought is to destroy our beloved genre.  And without our writers of science fiction speculating and wondering and weaving stories, who will dare dream of the future in a world so obsessed with itself?

This is why Forbidden Thoughts was created. We wanted to write stories that go so far against the grain, that it wakes people to the censorship that is taking hold in the publishing world. We wanted to write stories that challenge the ideals of today. Why? Because we can. And because it’s needed.

So if you are also weary of the same tripe being forced in your entertainment, if you want good stories and challenging outlooks, if you miss what science fiction used to be about, go check out a copy of this anthology. Available on Kindle for the price of a cup of coffee, and coming soon in paperback form. Plus, on January 20th, we will be having a release party live chat over at the SuperversiveSF blog.

Featuring  a foreword by Milo Yiannopoulos, and stories by:

Vox Day,

John C. Wright,

L. Jagi Lamplighter,

Brian Niemeier,

Sarah A. Hoyt,

Nick Cole,

And many more, including yours truly.

WARNING: Not recommended for special snowflakes, for there are no safe spaces here!

-This message brought to you by author A.M. Freeman 

You are not supposed to read this book.
You are not supposed to think about reading this book.
In fact, just plain thinking at all is unacceptable.
You have been warned….

From hilarious to horrifying to dangerously insightful, a selection of stories that must not be told, for they slaughter the sacred cows of our age.

Do you dare read them?

Get your Forbidden Thoughts Here!

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Nethereal

Nethereal mixes science-fiction, fantasy and horror in unexpected ways. Space running ether ships battle with magically worked devices, the mystical Guild controls the space lanes with otherworldly wheels and compasses, and necromancers meddle in the boundaries of life and death in horrid ways.

The tale focuses on a pirate crew fighting to free the worlds from the oppressive grip of the Guild. The captain is half-breed last of his kind, wiped out by the Guild, and commands the last of his people’s ships. Their navigator is a beautiful rogue Guilds-woman, who seems to have an inhuman heritage, and is followed by a hell-hound that hovers in the darkness. Their fighting-man is a scarred mercenary of endless campaigns with iron determination. Together they are pursued by an obsessive Guild-warden who will stop at no atrocity to kill them, and finally wipe out the last of the race the Guild warred with.

All of that is just in the beginning. Later they will tangle with necromancers, forbidden magics and technologies, cross the boundary into Hell itself, and face legendary beings of sanity-stretching scale.

http://www.amazon.com/Nethereal-Soul-Cycle-Book-1-ebook/dp/B00ZBDOHKU/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1454015010&sr=1-1&keywords=nethereal