• David Hallquist

    The the black hole stared back.

    • sciphi

      You guys are good at these!

  • David Hallquist

    Dragon For Hire: Will Rescue Princesses.

  • ronan

    I would love to see that episode – do you have a link to a clip of the technobabble joke? Technobabble was the best bit of Next Gen – they used it in lieu of special effects!

    • sciphi

      I tried to find a clip but I couldn’t, the episode is Where No Fan Has Gone Before.

      It is episode 4×12, I couldn’t find anywhere to stream it from.

  • EJSHUMAK

    As long as there are no genetically modified / artificially uplifted raccoons / trees/ etc bi will be happy. I can deal with hive minded aliens. I think we need a blockbuster that a serious audience can embrace. I don’t know if this is it. But I hope.
    Not that a silly space romp isn’t entertaining. I just would like a bit more thought put into it. We have such wonderful SF works produced in the last fifty years. I know cartoon characters make money band I don’t object. But a bit of thoughtful SF with massive stuff blowing up would be even
    Better.

    • sciphi

      Did you see Interstellar? That will give you a hard sci fi fix.

      Also, we can’t be friends any more! I loved Guardians 😛

      • EJSHUMAK

        No guardians was a great amusing romp and I supported t all the way to the dvd. But with all the comic book popularity. I’m hungry gor thought provoking stuff in an SF guise. I mean really. One of the best scenes is a musical dance number at the opening. That pretty much tells you. Sit back shut off your brain and be amused
        And I was. But not satiated with ideas and conflicting conflicts coupled with conceptualized concepts.
        No I haven’t seen interstellar. I very seldom go to movies out in the real world. So I’ll waut a bit.

        I am looking forward to LUCY that should be delivered tomorrow it seems to be loosely (VERY LOOSELY) based on ELFIN LIED (Japanese animation) which I loved

        I promise to be kind to Guardians.

        ;-)).
        Eh

  • EJSHUMAK

    Yes his adjectives and certain active verbs are colorful. But hell the man is right

  • Samuel Edwards

    Interesting article. I’m not sure I agree with her contention that arts reflects reality though. I think art should transcend reality.

  • A series that went from serving the needs of drama but not of traditional culture – to serving the needs of modern culture, but not of drama.

    I will admit that I’ve only read the first of the Anita Blake books. But in this case, that’s enough to challenge this statement: that series was pretty much serving the needs of the modern overblown female superheroine needs a bad boy were-something-or-other culture right from the beginning.

    Now… in that first book, it admittedly wasn’t anywhere near as far gone as many things are today. But it’s definitely still there, right from the get go.

  • SolarSistim

    Holy smokes! Thanks for featuring my chart, and let’s not forget that it was Dirk Loechel that created the original art. Cheers!

    • sciphi

      Thanks for supplying the awesome chart! I don’t want to think how much time I have spent looking at it!

  • I remember thinking the Space Trilogy was OK but not amazing… but then, I read it more than 15 years ago when I was still a solid agnostic. I’ve been thinking lately about brushing it off again now that I’m Catholic, and you might have just nudge me over the edge to do it.

  • Stupid people haven’t managed to wipe us off the planet yet. I’ll wait a bit before I worry about stupid machines.

  • EJSHUMAK

    You are right my friend. But it is interesting. To me. Especially as to the slant of this liberal media. I think slant bias and silliness are requirements of the new inter web. Thanks for the reasoned response and not attacking me personally. I am a very sensitive old man.

  • EJSHUMAK

    This is great –thanks

  • EJSHUMAK

    ‘–))

  • EJSHUMAK

    This is so true I have heard educators comment on this as if it is a wonderful thing and it is in supposedly important so that gender-neutral children can feel comfortable where are these gender-neutral children coming from.

    I have also heard an interesting position about the difference between conservatives and liberals. The concept was that the difference is the conservatives see responsibility in individuals and liberals see responsibility existing within inanimate objects as in neighborhoods poor housing and firearms.

  • EJSHUMAK

    SciPhi Journal is unique. Think about that a moment. This creation does not exist elsewhere and would not exist save for your efforts Jason. There are perhaps millions of SF periodicals if one includes all languages and all circulations. To the best of my knowledge, there is only ONE Science Fiction Philosophy periodical. To lose that would be a true shame and a loss to the SF community. I wanted to say a loss to the world — but I restrained myself. I searched and found many books on the subject (Philosophy and SF) but nary a single periodical of any kind. This is important work that should be continues

  • Joe Katzman

    “viscious” = vicious.

    viscous = thick liquid
    vicious = savage
    viscious = Green Slime (TM). I hated that stuff.

  • EJSHUMAK

    I don’t think that corporate greed (As horrible and harmful as it is) has to do with shame. Greed is greed and evil inand of itself. And I am a strong union man. Here inthe US we would have nothing without the union wars of the early 20th century. Many died to allow the workers a reasonable life. Not all unions truly serve their members — but like anytghing else, Stereotyping is inappropriate one must judge this on a specidic basis.

    However as to societal norms I couldn’t agree more. This is why after so many years and with a lessthan perfect grasp of the language, I still perfer Japanese TV and watchmore of that than US television.

  • Maybe it actually succeeded, just in a very bad way? You got me curious to see it now, but I think I will pass on this one..

  • I doubt this will ever happen, but I hope it will.. I am looking forward to the movie sagas of the Dark Tower and The Stand though.

  • Joe Katzman

    President Harry Truman had this problem. His solution was that you don’t abandon your friends, period. I’m very much inclined toward this view.

    And it’s not for an idea you hate. It’s the idea that some things are bigger than politics, and not under the supervision of politics. I love that idea. Its converse ensures totalitarianism – and that IS something I hate.

    The only way for humanism to defeat hate is to make our humanity more important than hate. That is not done by declaring that their hatred of your friend’s ideas takes precedence over maintaining a human connection to another view. To put it bluntly: what they are demanding is precisely that hate take precedence over humanity. In asking, they reveal themselves as the very mirror image of the thing they claim to oppose.

    The only moral thing, for someone who places humanity above hate, is to refuse their request.

  • EJSHUMAK

    Thanks so much for a well thought out comment, Foxfier. Your thoughts are appreciated. It is always good to know who is out there–

  • Aaron

    What time is this for other locations around the globe? Like for example… Sydney AU?

    • sciphi

      5am. Gonna be an early morning for us sydney siders.

  • EJSHUMAK

    We, unfortunately, have a thing called a moral compass and a conscience. That precludes denying these relative evil thinkers their rights. So we try to inform and educate, but it often falls on deaf ears or is heard only by the choir. But we must not stop trying.

  • What is this thing?

  • I have no idea what to do

  • This makes the decision to enroll in KDP Select that much easier.

  • Hi Anthony, there’s a lot of philosophical depth to your argument, so I don’t aspire to give a definitive response to your conclusions. However, I think that what you call ‘nihilistic’ would be better described as ‘absurdist’. That’s because the universe can lack meaning or purpose without implying it must be devoid of substance. For example, an absurdist can recognize that another being is in pain, and want to alleviate that suffering. A nihilist wouldn’t care. Writers like Douglas Adams clearly belong to the former school, not the latter.

    To use a grand analogy, the Hindu cosmology asserts the universe is created and destroyed in a cyclical pattern where each cycle takes 8 billion years. (So you could argue that the Hindus – via Nietzsche – influenced the plot of Battlestar Galactica!) Your complaint about there being no meaning to the journey could just as well be applied to this cosmology – why struggle to accomplish anything, when it’ll be destroyed and then we’ll be reborn and have the same struggle again? Absurdist writer Albert Camus was making a similar point when he wrote about the Greek mythological character Sisyphus, who was compelled to repeatedly push a boulder to the top of a hill, only to watch it roll back down, where Sisyphus would start over. But suppose we substitute a definitive final destination for the Hindu idea of a recurring cycle. That means we eventually arrive at where we were meant to be. Sisyphus would get the boulder to the top and it would stay there. What then? We would then be confronted with the same problem of determining what gives meaning to life from that moment forward.

    An absurdist could agree we adopt contingent destinations – places we head towards for lack of having a better goal. And when we reach them, we can adopt a new contingent destination. Perhaps none of these destinations have any ‘real’ meaning. If you want to believe in a universe where there is a definitive ultimate destination – one that isn’t just contingent – then that’s fine too, but then you’ve got to admit to a really tricky question of where ‘real’ meaning would come from once that destination is reached.

  • David Hallquist

    Mrs. Wright does place a high bar indeed in a superversive tale involving transcendent awe. Perhaps, someday, I shall be able to join the greats in crafting such a work. Still, I think Superversive work is worthwhile even if I cannot reach that level, as so very few ever do.

    I see Superversive as essentially the opposite of Subversive. It is literature meant to enlighten (rather than confuse) to create wonder and hope (rather then despair) and to build up society (rather than tear it down). So, in that respect, I hope to continue with Superversive literature.

    • Anthony M

      I don’t know if it’s a “bar”, per se – Harry Potter neatly fits all of the superversive criteria, but Shakespeare’s fantasy “Macbeth” dos not. Quality does not seem to be the issue, then, or at least no to the point where you need to reach brilliance.

  • sciphi

    You can hear a pin drop among all the cries out outrage from the SJW’s condemning this disruption though.

    Which, certainly by their logic, means they approve of it.

  • luckymarty

    Is this downloadable somewhere?
    Also, you may want to correct the typo in the YouTube title.

  • The s-f literary establishment never made it a secret they would buy sustaining memberships at $40 a pop for people. There is probably something in the data that would point to that wholesale membership buying, and those memberships being linked to No Award ballots.

  • Anthony M

    A: In preparing to write these articles, I read some of this year’s nominees and winners. I found Heuveldt’s “The Day the World Turned Upside-Down” utterly charming. I think I liked it so much because it matches my own personality worldview: I have that optimistic, what-if wondering Extroverted Intuition but it’s combined with super idealism about love and relationships. So I understood immediately that when gravity flipped, this wasn’t intended to be a scientific event, but in some ways it was just about how devastating it is to lose love.

    This is exactly the problem with its nomination. You recognized the flipping as not being scientific – so science fiction is out. Fantasy is out – there’s never shown to be anything magical about it except, yeah, things flipped. The concept isn’t explored from EITHER direction.

    It was just a story told as a metaphor. It’s not sci-fi or fantasy properly understood, and never should have been nominated.

  • test

    • Anthony M

      I noticed what I think you’re noticing as well. Some comments go to this “SmallResize” page?