Join The Chorus: The Blog as a Serial Fiction Outlet

Benjamim Cheah has a good serial story–“Night Demons”–going on at PulpRev this week. You can read it starting here, and it’s a good follow-up to Rawle Nyanzi’s “Enemy at Blood River” (which starts here). Both men have made good use of the blog medium as an outlet for serialized fiction.

If you want to join the chorus, now is the time and using a blog to serialize your stories is a great way to get started. The risk is low, the cost is nil, and you can home your craft by learning and practicing the skills that made the masters great until you are ready to start pushing for people to pay you for your work.

It doesn’t stop there. You can continue to use serialized fiction on your blog to attract and retain your audience, using the stories to advertise for upcoming books while getting readers interested in your growing backlist as your career in writing progresses. Be it just a feature on your otherwise not-specifically-fiction blog, or one you launch for that purpose specifically, it does work. Just look at John C. Wright’s blog if you want a great example in practice.

Be it as a hobby or as a professional development tool, fiction or not, consider using a blog for a writing outlet. I would not have gotten into the PulpRev Sampler if I didn’t blog daily, nor be posting here or at PulpRev (or guest-posting elsewhere, such as Castalia House), so it has benefits that should not be dismissed.

Join the chorus. There’s always room for another voice.

Signal Boost: Paragons

I am proud to introduce to you the latest release from Silver Empire publishing: Paragons: An Anthology of Superheroes

Silver Empire’s mission statement is “to find and publish the best heroic, wondrous adventure fiction out there. Like you, we wanted stories that still showcased heroism. And we like fiction that dares to show us wonders we’ve never imagined.”

Yeah, with a statement like that, an anthology about superheroes was something we all should have seen coming.

Look – up in the sky!

They awe us. They fill us with wonder. But most of all, they inspire us – to be stronger, faster, and smarter. Superheroes teach us how to aspire to the best versions of ourselves. Enjoy this master collection of collection of 13 tales of all-new, all-original superheroes from today’s up and coming science fiction and fantasy masters!

When the police fail to take down the super powered mobs a rogue vigilante steps up to the plate in Nightstick by Kai Wai Cheah. Peek in on a superhero marriage proposal via Blackout by Morgon Newquist. When a young nuclear engineer gains superpowers, the Soviet government wants to control her for the sake of the motherland in Stalina by Sam Kepfield.

Enjoy these tales and more by Alt-Hero novelist Jon Del Arroz, Dragon Award and Hugo Award nominee Kai Wai Cheah, Dragon Award nominee Declan Finn, and others!

My own particular contribution to the series is “The Weather Witch,” about an African girl, raised in a missionary school, attacked by slavers. Only in this case, the leader of these slavers is a giant fellow, with crackling yellow electricity eyes. He jokes that “His mother was the lightning.”

And since this little girl has grown up with this risk her entire life, she decided that she’s not going to go down easy — she jabs the guy in the eyes.  They both get a bit of a shock…

So what happens when a ten year old girl basically finger jabs the eyes of a monster run on elemental forces?

Get the book. Find out.

The Quest For Space Princesses

This past Thursday, over at my main blog, I mentioned how I saw a trend in people making their own Star Wars riffs emphasizing the underworld and Mil-SF elements over the traditional Space Opera ones- and that I want to go the other way.

This led to follow-ups from Brian Niemeier (splicing in a similar thread by Alfred Genesson) and Jeffro Johnson and just about all of us figured that the Space Opera audience just isn’t getting enough Space Princes, Princesses, etc. (unless you go to Japan; they’re rarely lacking in such Romantic figures).

We cannot allow a Space Princess gap!

While we have the efforts of a handful of faithful inheritors of Burroughs and E.E. Smith out there, since 1980 at the latest (There’s that date again!) we have (outside of Star Wars) a distinct lacking of Space Princesses and the other key signifiers of the grand Romantic roots of Space Opera in Western media.

Why does this matter? Because you don’t reliably get Superversive without some Romantic elements; they’re roots for a reason. (Hark! I see you romance novelists over there! Shoo, you uncultured barbarians! These are not the ships you’re looking for!) Like it or not, the way a culture embraces the Superversive can be found in the Operatic mythologies it generates and passes on generation after generation- and we in the West are terrible about this outside of Star Wars.

If we are to regenerate our cultures, then we must embrace once more the heroism that our predecessors did and make it our own. Space Opera–made iconic by Princes & Princesses that are commonplace–is how we do this best now, something even superheroes don’t quite handle, and until we do we’re going to be at a disadvantage.

That means that there is an opportunity, for those bold enough to seize it. Go for it, folks. Take up that quest, and bring us the best Space Opera–laying on the myth and fantastic thick–that you can. Once the West had them in abundance. Now only Japan remembers them so. Make Space Opera Great Again! Bring back our Space Princesses!

ANNOUNCEMENT: Submissions Open for Saturn Anthology!

Saturn. The most beautiful of the wandering stars, surrounded by a mysterious and remarkable series of rings, crowning the planet in glory.

Jupiter may be the king of the planets, but Saturn is the progenitor, named for the powerful and terrible Titan that fathered the gods themselves. Saturn is the lord of Time, Age, and Endings. And when everything else disperses into a heat death and the cosmos is an empty void, it is Time that will rule over all.

The frame story of Saturn will be set in John C. Wright’s City Beyond Time universe! Don’t know what that is? Read the book, it’s awesome.

Stories do not need to be set in that universe.

However, they can be.

One last thing. If you have already sent in a story, resend it. I probably have it, but can make no guarantees.

Bullet point form:

  • Word count is 500-10,000
  • Poems will be accepted
  • Reprints will be accepted
  • Simultaneous submissions will be accepted
  • Stories can be about the actual planet Saturn, time, age, and endings. The Titan Saturn may also feature, and stories may be set in the City Beyond Time universe.
  • Submissions should be in standard manuscript format, though please italicize instead of underline when appropriate. If the story is not in standard manuscript format, it may be rejected without being read. Seriously. I’m not kidding here. For that matter, ditto if the stories are under 500 words or over 10,000.
  • The subject line should look like this: SATURN SUBMISSION/Story Title/Author Last Name
  • The deadline is December 1, 2017. After that, you’re out of luck.
  • Please resend your submissions if you have already sent something in. I PROBABLY have it, but as they say, better safe than sorry!

The submission e-mail is [email protected]

The editors are Anthony and Mariel Marchetta, known for their work in the critically acclaimed anthology “God, Robot” and the recently released “Tales of the Once and Future King”.

Good luck!

DragonCon 2017: Magnificent Men of Sci-Fi/Fantasy Panel

The top men of our genres discuss their careers & offer advice to new writers.
Panelists: Kevin J. Anderson, Jim Butcher, Larry Correia, Peter David, and Larry Niven.Yes, it’s audio only.

Sorry, again, this isn’t mine, so no, I can’t fix any problems that arise. I just find the stuff, and hope you enjoy it.

Enjoy, all.

amzn.to/2wF41P2

DragonCon 2017: From the Beginning: The Evolution of the Urban Fantasy Protagonist

The authors on this panel have played vital roles in the advancement of the Urban Fantasy genre. We’ll discuss how their seminal characters have developed & changed over time, all while continuing to influence the field.Panelists: Patricia Briggs, Jim Butcher, Laurel K. Hamilton, Kim Harrison, Sherrilyn Kenyon.

Skim this particular video one.

Why? I think you’ll see why, after a while.

I have never seen Jim Butcher go passive aggressive before, but when he says, “I think Joss Whedon has something to do with Urban Fantasy. Just a little,” he sounds just a might put out.

Best lines

Butcher: “Laurell writes Hammer villians, Harry Dresden is a magical Spencer for Hire. We take archetypes of different genres and use them. Genre is just a publisher’s problem.”

Pat Briggs: College writing progessors can rip books apart, they can’t put them together.
Kenyon: I was kicked out of a writing track as being too disruptive.
Briggs: I got a C on a story that ended up in a NY Times bestselling anthology.

Butcher will also be doing a Goodman Grey Spinoff, as well as one for Maggie Dresden. Yes, really.

Fun fun fun.

amzn.to/2wF41P2

DragonCon 2017: The Logic of Magic

A panel on developing magic systems, with Jim Butcher, Kathryn Hinds, Faith Hunter, and Elizabeth Moon.Yeah, sorry about the audio on this one. Turn the volume up to maximum, and concentrate real hard. Otherwise, you may not be able to hear anything.

Again, I didn’t do this video, so I have no control over how it turned out. Though I’m going to have to listen to this one later. I couldn’t get into this one for love or money.

Enjoy.