Submission call for “To Be Men: Stories Celebrating Masculinity”

If you are sick of today’s portrayals of men as bumbling idiots, of fathers as incompetents, of masculinity as “toxic” then I invite you to send us your best story featuring men at their best.

We want…

  • Stories showing the masculine virtues in a positive light.
  • Stories that introduce or reintroduce young men to the manly virtues.
  • Stories that pay homage to men and masculinity.

Well-crafted, immersive stories in all genres (except horror) are welcome, but the manly virtue can’t depend on a speculative element, i.e. magic or superpowers do not make the man. You can have magic. You can have a superhero. But that’s not what makes him a man. It’s not what defines masculinity. No present tense. Contact me at manlyantho@superversivepress.com if you’re not sure.

Submission deadline: Feb. 14, 2018

Short Story Formatting Checklist

Send submissions to manlyantho@superversivepress.com with the subject line: Manly Antho – YourStoryTitle.

Hard Sci-fi Made Me Cry

Tired of the remakes, the reboots, the “let’s see how much more blood we can squeeze out of this turnip” output of today’s Hollywood? I think you’ll find Passengers a refreshing change.

If like me, you didn’t rush out to see it in the theatre, it might’ve been because of blurbs like this one from IMDB: “A spacecraft traveling to a distant colony planet and transporting thousands of people has a malfunction in its sleep chambers. As a result, two passengers are awakened 90 years early.”

Sounds like a snore, doesn’t it?

It is rated PG-13, just under two hours long, and tagged as adventure, drama, and romance. What it is, however, is a story about love, redemption, and forgiveness. It’s about making the best of life, even when things don’t go as planned. It’s about the pioneering spirit, about a positive future, about what a man and a woman can achieve together.

“But wait, you said this is hard sci-fi.”

Yes, I did. And I stand by it. It’s science fiction because of the setting, a spaceship traveling between the stars. It’s hard sci-fi because it’s closer to 2001: A Space Odyssey in that it’s an extrapolation of current knowledge, than to the space-fantasy cum turnip known as Star Wars.

But what this movie actually is, is a great example of using science/setting as a trope, a literary device for delivering a character-driven story. The science is not the point of the story, but there is enough verisimilitude that it has a real feel to it (this comes from someone who can get really picky about the scientific details). Continue reading